Smart Vehicles

Moderator:

14:30

Autonomous systems: surviving the nanosecond blue screen

Clearly, this is a hypothetical driver as human drivers make mistakes all the time. And how would you feel when your car updates its driving software while driving? How smart is a self-driving software that keeps on speeding after it detected six times in a row that the driver was not paying attention to its warnings? How smart is it to have a dishwasher talk to the internet so that it doesn't work when you have no connection? Of course, this type of smartness was introduced by smart people. The issue is complexity, made worse by legacy developed at a time when trustworthiness was a second thought. In the real world the complexity is immense and the law of Murphy is king. The question is how can we make things simultanously smart and trustworthy? Another question is whether such a smart system should mimic a human brain? Trustworthy means predictable, safe and secure which are all aspects for which humans have a very bad reputation. The road to salvation is a systematic one whereby unavoidable errors and faults are taking into account at every step of the development. Fault tolerance and resilience are key.

Eric Verhulst - CEO/CTO
14:50

Title yet to come

Edgar Vuelban - CTO SoftKinetic
15:10

Title still to come

Bart Truyen, Managing Director - eXia

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